Posts under Kubernetes network policies

New Year, Better StackRox: Extending Our Lead in Kubernetes-Native Security

New Year, Better StackRox: Extending Our Lead in Kubernetes-Native Security

StackRox is continuing to shape the future of Kubernetes by enabling customers to build, deploy and run cloud-native applications at scale securely. In recent months, we have released several new, important features covered in this post, focusing on enhanced detection capabilities and simplified administrative workflows. This focus drove new protections for the Kubernetes API server, additional context for the Network Graph, support for the syslog protocol, and a simplified Helm chart installation and upgrade process.

Kubernetes Security 101: Risks and 29 Best Practices

Kubernetes Security 101: Risks and 29 Best Practices

By every measure, Kubernetes is dominating the container orchestration market. Our latest State of Kubernetes and Container Security report found that 87 percent of organizations are managing some portion of their container workloads using Kubernetes. The same survey shows that 94 percent of organizations have experienced a serious security issue in the last 12 months in their container environment, with 69 percent having detected misconfigurations, 27 percent experiencing runtime security incidents, and 24 percent discovering significant vulnerabilities to remediate.

Guide to Kubernetes Egress Network Policies

Guide to Kubernetes Egress Network Policies

A few months ago, we published a guide to setting up Kubernetes network policies, which focused exclusively on ingress network policies. This follow-up post explains how to enhance your network policies to also control allowed egress. A Brief Recap: What are Network Policies? Network policies are used in Kubernetes to specify how groups of pods are allowed to communicate with each other and with external network endpoints. They can be thought of as the Kubernetes equivalent of a firewall.

Guide to Kubernetes Ingress Network Policies

Guide to Kubernetes Ingress Network Policies

The container orchestrator war is over, and Kubernetes has won. With companies large and small rapidly adopting the platform, security has emerged as an important concern – partly because of the learning curve inherent in understanding any new infrastructure, and partly because of recently announced vulnerabilities. Kubernetes brings another security dynamic to the table – its defaults are geared towards making it easy for users to get up and running quickly, as well as being backward compatible with earlier releases of Kubernetes that lacked important security features.