Posts under Kubernetes Security

What the Palo Alto-Twistlock Acquisition Means for Container Security Market

What the Palo Alto-Twistlock Acquisition Means for Container Security Market

Today news broke that Palo Alto Networks (NYSE: PANW) is buying container security startup Twistlock for approximately $410 million. The acquisition provides great validation of the container security market and broader cloud-native security market. Twistlock is Palo Alto’s third security acquisition since Nikesh Arora took over as CEO and reflects the growing importance of the broader cloud security market. Enterprises today are looking for ways to enforce security and compliance policies as they embrace the business benefits of cloud-native application architectures across multi-cloud and hybrid cloud environments.

Kubernetes Network Policies - A Detailed Security Guide

Kubernetes Network Policies - A Detailed Security Guide

The container orchestrator war is over, and Kubernetes has won. With companies large and small rapidly adopting the platform, security has emerged as an important concern – partly because of the learning curve inherent in understanding any new infrastructure, and partly because of recently announced vulnerabilities. Kubernetes brings another security dynamic to the table – its defaults are geared towards making it easy for users to get up and running quickly, as well as being backward compatible with earlier releases of Kubernetes that lacked important security features.

New Kubernetes Security Vulnerabilities Disclosed: CVE-2019-1002101 and CVE-2019-9946

New Kubernetes Security Vulnerabilities Disclosed: CVE-2019-1002101 and CVE-2019-9946

Two Kubernetes security vulnerabilities were disclosed yesterday: CVE-2019-1002101, a high severity issue, and CVE-2019-9946, a medium severity issue. Read on for a description of the vulnerabilities and their impact, how to know whether you’re affected, and what the remediation steps are. CVE-2019-1002101: kubectl cp could replace or delete files on a user machine This vulnerability is in the kubectl binary – specifically, in the kubectl cp command. An attacker can exploit this vulnerability to write files to any path on the user’s machine, limited only by the system permissions of the local user.

Kubernetes 1.14 is Out - What Are the New Features?

Kubernetes 1.14 is Out - What Are the New Features?

Kubernetes 1.14 is out! As always, we at StackRox are excited to dive in and see what’s new. And this release didn’t disappoint – from major new features and security improvements to small enhancements that simplify the day-to-day life of operators, this update includes a lot to unpack (and a few deprecation warnings to watch out for!). Windows Support is now Stable This feature is the big one: starting with 1.

11 Tips to Operationalizing Kubernetes Admission Controllers for Better Security

11 Tips to Operationalizing Kubernetes Admission Controllers for Better Security

Kubernetes provides several built-in security capabilities, including network security, resource isolation, access control, and logging and auditing. One of the more recent security capabilities is a group of plugins known as admission controllers. Admission controllers enable governance and enforcement of how clusters are used. Kubernetes ships with over 30 admission controllers, which are listed here along with their descriptions. This article assumes you have a basic understanding of admission controllers, but if you are unfamiliar with them, check out Kubernetes reference guide on admission controllers to learn more.

StackRox – Putting the Customer at the Center of Kubernetes Security

StackRox – Putting the Customer at the Center of Kubernetes Security

When we officially launched the StackRox Kubernetes Security Platform about 18 months ago, we highlighted that microservices, containers, and Kubernetes were the next stage in the evolution of application development in the cloud-native stack. While DevOps embraced microservices and its advantages in delivering unprecedented speed, efficiency, and portability, security teams were frequently left in the dark or brought in a little too late. Today, security teams are proactively working with DevOps to ensure that their organization’s security and compliance requirements are adequately addressed before new apps go live.

Must-Have Capabilities When Evaluating Container Security Solutions

Must-Have Capabilities When Evaluating Container Security Solutions

More and more organizations are transforming their businesses by embracing DevOps principles, microservice design patterns, and container and orchestrator technologies such as Docker and Kubernetes. While security teams have the same mission regardless of the technology stack in use – keep the bad guys out and find and stop them if they do break in – the tools and tactics security staff employ must change to accommodate this infrastructure shift.