StackRox

Insights from Docker’s Modernizing Traditional Applications roadshow

It should come as no surprise that behind the rapid adoption of Docker containers are a set of slam-dunk cost and operational benefits. According to Docker, enterprise IT budgets are heavily consumed by maintenance and upkeep of legacy applications on the order of 80%. Containers drastically change that equation, and the customers that leverage them are realizing massive improvements in resource utilization, resulting in a 50%-60% drop in virtual machines (VMs)– and ultimately, hypervisor licenses– required to run the refactored application.

Image - Clearing the enterprise’s path to the public cloud with container security

Clearing the enterprise’s path to the public cloud with container security

Enterprise organizations across diverse verticals, such as 3M, Adobe, Kellogg’s, and Netflix, have been ramping up their use of the public cloud to the point where that usage accounts for a substantial portion of their annual IT spend. ‘Enterprises with big budgets, data centers, and complex applications are now looking at cloud as a viable place to run core business applications’, according to Dave Bartoletti, an analyst at Forrester Research.

Image - CSI: Container Edition - forensics in the age of containers

CSI: Container Edition - forensics in the age of containers

Forensics in the age of containers You’ve seen it countless times in television’s most popular dramas: professional investigators descend on the scene of a crime to meticulously record and analyze every detail and clue before anyone else can disrupt the scene. If the crime appears to be related to other ongoing cases, clues are tacked to the peg board back at headquarters. Only once all the pieces have been assembled do patterns emerge.

Image - Protecting against containerized web app attacks

Protecting against containerized web app attacks

WAF the heck do I do to protect against attacks on my container-based web applications? The hackers who want your organization’s valuable data will invariably target your web applications. Despite the steady increase in distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks and ransomware, web application attacks represent the most common cause of data breaches.1 The vast majority of these attacks are executed by botnets, operated by organized crime2. Their goals: stealing credentials, growing the size of the botnet, and, of course, exfiltrating information that can be used for financial gain.